FORGOTTEN: For almost two years, the Nyanyukweni community have struggled to access basic necessities such as fresh water. PHOTO: ELIZABETH JOSEPH
FORGOTTEN: For almost two years, the Nyanyukweni community have struggled to access basic necessities such as fresh water. PHOTO: ELIZABETH JOSEPH

Community's cry for help ignored

Basic necessities a far-fetched dream
The Nyanyukweni community in the Tobias Hainyeko constituency says despite pleading for help, their dire living conditions remain unchanged.
Elizabeth Joseph
Despite alerting City of Windhoek officials of their plight last month, the Nyanyukweni community in the Tobias Hainyeko constituency say their problems remain unresolved.

Community leader, Josephine Kamati, last week said the community have tried to reach out to Windhoek mayor Sade Gawanas recently, but they were informed that she is currently out of the country.

"The situation remains unchanged. The community still struggles with necessities like access to water and proper ablution facilities. We make use of a communal tap that is far from our homes. Children have to make use of the riverbed when they want to use the toilet," Kamati said.

In 2020, the community was relocated after heavy rains forced them from their homes.

At the time, they say they were promised that they could return to their homes after the rains had subsided. Since then, they have had to make do with whatever resources were at their disposal.

A communal tap, located more than three kilometres away, is their only source of clean water. To reach it, some community members have to navigate slippery gravel paths and steep embankments.

Bitter cold

During the winter, when temperatures plummeted, community members collected water during the afternoon to avoid a long walk in the cold.

"Just last week, my daughter had an accident while returning with a bucket of water. The dangers have not decreased. In the morning, it is so cold that the children cannot walk that far for water," Kamati said.

Hilma Laurence, another worried member of the community, said: "Using the toilet in the bushes is scary because it is colder in a riverbed than anywhere else."

Gawanas told Namibian Sun last month that she was not aware of the community’s plight, as their relocation did not happen under her watch. She, however, said she would investigate.

She was not available for further comment, as she was out of the country, according to a municipal spokesperson.

Comments

Namibian Sun 2022-12-04

No comments have been left on this article

Please login to leave a comment