Geingob supports legal ivory trade

09 May 2019 | Environment

ELLANIE SMIT

President Hage Geingob has expressed concern over the increasing costs and security implications of holding ivory stocks and reiterated Namibia’s favourable stance towards the resumption of legal international ivory trade.

Geingob, who is also the chairman of SADC, made these remarks at the Kasane Elephant Summit.

The presidents of Botswana, Zimbabwe, Zambia and Namibia, as well as Angola’s environment minister, met at Kasane, Botswana, on Tuesday to forge a common policy toward elephant management, saying that conflict between elephants and rural farmers is escalating.

Ivory sales currently require approval from the international community through the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES).

Geingob said Namibia continued to exercise strict control over ivory stocks, but he stressed that stocks continue to accumulate, by an average of 4.5% per year, primarily because of natural deaths.

He said the proceeds from the legal ivory trade would be utilised to support elephant conservation and rural conservation programmes.

He said with regard to the trade in elephant specimens, Namibia has fully complied with CITES requirements and contributed to the development of a rigorous trade control system.

“As a result, Namibia successfully exported raw ivory between 1999 and 2008, proving that with adequate controls and strict enforcement measures, ivory can be traded legally.”

He further stressed that the Namibian elephant population was secure.

“The population recovery over the past several years attests to our management efforts. Changing times call for appropriate management strategies to be developed in order to maintain the historic coexistence between our people and elephants.”

Geingob said Namibia had taken note of the criticism of elephant population management in Botswana and affirmed its support of the new policies and programmes on elephant population management and sustainable use, which have been developed by the Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA) partner states.

He continued to say that conservancies manage approximately 19.8% of the total Namibian surface area.

“By joining large contiguous areas and thereby allowing wildlife to roam freely, environmental restoration has been achieved and healthy wildlife populations sustained.”

He said Namibia’s conservation model has enabled expansion of the elephant population from just over 7 500 in 1995 to 24 000 at present.

According to him the biggest potential threat to the Namibian elephant population is the loss of habitat due to cyclical periods of drought.

Another problem area is fragmentation of range and the rising incidence of human-elephant conflict.

“We are aware that these challenges are not unique to Namibia and exist within all member states. We therefore welcome the developed Elephant Management and Planning Framework, which will assist partner states to manage their elephants as one contiguous population through a harmonised approach.”

He said that Namibia supports the realization of a shared approach towards elephant conservation via the KAZA Agreement, thereby, remaining committed towards a common vision for the management of Southern Africa’s elephants.

Geingob said conservation generated much-needed economic returns for rural communities. By the end of 2017, community conservation contributed an estimated N$7 billion to the net national income, facilitating job growth within local communities.

“With this in mind, Namibia affirms the call for communities to be actively involved in the protection and conservation of environment and biodiversity. We further underscore that programmes to promote conservation of biodiversity must positively impact the standard of living of rural communities.”

Geingob further said that the tremendous potential presented by tourism sector remained largely untapped and brimming with possibilities for accelerated socio- economic growth and development in the sub-region.

“The conservation and sustainable management of our natural resources remain key markets in rekindling economic growth and job creation.”

He also said that the free movement of people must be facilitated, especially to enable Africans who are traveling within Africa.

He called for the easing of movement of people across African borders and affirmed Namibia’s commitment to implement the KAZA UNIVISA, which has been successfully piloted in Zambia and Zimbabwe since 2014.

Similar News

 

Conservation fee coming next year

6 days ago - 28 July 2020 | Environment

ELLANIE SMITWINDHOEKThe environment ministry will introduce a conservation fee next year that will be paid by all visitors to national parks in addition to the...

Securing a poaching scene

1 week ago - 27 July 2020 | Environment

ELLANIE SMIT WINDHOEK Intelligence Support Against Poaching (ISAP) recently held a course on how to handle a poaching scene correctly. ...

Namibia's trade in live elephants 2nd in Africa

1 week ago - 23 July 2020 | Environment

ELLANIE SMIT WINDHOEK The second highest number of live elephant exports in Africa comes from Namibia. However, the problematic interpretation of...

Ondangwa is afraid of birds

2 weeks ago - 16 July 2020 | Environment

ILENI NANDJATOONDANGWAThe Ondangwa town council is afraid that a large group of cattle egrets converging at a park in town might be dangerous to people.The...

KAZA elephants could be dying of stress - Shifeta

2 weeks ago - 14 July 2020 | Environment

ILENI NANDJATOONDANGWAEnvironment and tourism minister Pohamba Shifeta says overpopulation could be the reason for the unexplained deaths of more than 350 of elephants in the...

Anti-poaching dog unit given teeth

3 weeks ago - 10 July 2020 | Environment

ELLANIE SMITWINDHOEKThe environment ministry has purchased four more dogs for to expand its anti-poaching dog unit.Currently the dog unit has four dogs, Alex, Benno, Baron...

More than 200 000 benefit from EIF projects

3 weeks ago - 10 July 2020 | Environment

ELLANIE SMITWINDHOEKA total of 238 000 people are expected to benefit from current projects funded by the Environmental Investment Fund of Namibia (EIF).Environment minister Pohamba...

San's existence under threat

3 weeks ago - 09 July 2020 | Environment

STAFF REPORTER WINDHOEK The San's environment is constantly under threat, and while they were once able to sustain themselves and their way of...

B2Gold project steps in to save rhinos

3 weeks ago - 08 July 2020 | Environment

ELLANIE SMITWINDHOEKLocal organisations supporting conservation in Namibia have seen their budgets slashed by up to 30%, as the coronavirus pandemic significantly impacts the world's economy.Among...

Conservancy consultations resume after lockdown

3 weeks ago - 08 July 2020 | Environment

ELLANIE SMITWINDHOEKThe N?a Jaqna Conservancy has resumed village consultation meetings with its members that were put on hold earlier this year due to the coronavirus...

Latest News

Two more CPCs for NSX

20 hours ago | Business

Two capital pool companies (CPC) listed on the Development Board (DevX) of the Namibian Stock Exchange (NSX) on Friday: Mcube Investments One Ltd and Omajowa...

Another tough year for Nictus

20 hours ago | Business

Jo-Maré Duddy – Locally-listed Nictus Holdings’ results for the 12 months ended 31 March 2020 reflect the impact of the ongoing recession in Namibia with...

Familiar faces surface at IPC

20 hours ago | Politics

OGONE TLHAGEWINDHOEKFamiliar faces have surfaced in the newly launched Independent Patriots for Change (IPC), which held its founding national convention in Windhoek over the weekend.The...

Seven Covid-19 cases in Windhoek...

20 hours ago | Health

JANA-MARI SMITHWINDHOEKWith nearly 100 Covid-19 cases confirmed in Windhoek, there is growing fear about how informal settlements – which so far have seven confirmed cases...

Journalist lands in trouble for...

20 hours ago | Government

OGONE TLHAGEWINDHOEKNamibia Press Agency (Nampa) journalist Edward Mumbuu has found himself in hot water with his employer after he asked President Hage Geingob a Fishrot-related...

De Beers likely to cut...

20 hours ago | Business

LONDON/GABORONE - Diamond mining giant De Beers is likely to have to cut jobs, its chief executive said on Thursday, as it outlined plans for...

Overview of VAT in Namibia

20 hours ago | Business

The Value-added Tax Act in Namibia imposes a liability to pay VAT on (a) every taxable supply of goods and services and (b) every import...

Journalism increasingly under threat in...

20 hours ago | Opinion

“I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it.” This quote, often attributed to French philosopher...

Kunene commits on service delivery...

20 hours ago | Economics

The most fundamental reason for the existence of any government is to ensure the provision of housing and land to its people.This was said by...

Load More