More people at Fishcor must answer

21 February 2020 | Opinion

While a lot of light has been shone on the so-called Fishrot Six since the fishing quota bribery scandal unfolded late last year, the same attention has not been replicated on State-owned company Fishcor that finds itself right at the nucleus of this mess.

Until the arrest of Fishcor CEO Mike Nghipunya this week, no serious actions were taken against anyone at the company, despite it being fingered as a vehicle that was used to steal the country’s resources for the benefit of a few unscrupulous elements.

Fishcor forms part of this scandal’s DNA and we are thus shocked that apart from James Hatuikulipi, who resigned voluntarily as board chairperson, and Nghipunya, no other soul at the company has faced curious scrutiny.

Namibian Sun this week sought answers from remaining board members as to how this grand thievery transpired under their noses – none of them were willing to accept their part in not stopping the loot.

Instead, the Fishcor board members produced a cocktail of excuses. From supposedly joining after the looting already occurred to simply not noting the theft when it happened.

In their minds, this concoction of justifications is enough for them to be left alone. Why they believe it is morally correct to continue serving on the board is really only known to them.

Apart from board members, we also wonder how those in Fishcor’s financial department have not been hauled before courts to explain the basis upon which they pressed that last button for the criminal transactions to go through.

Were they simply complying with instructions from above? Did they suspect filth and, if so, whom did they alert?

On face value, it would seem that some of the people behind bars in this matter, especially the so-called hangers-on, might have committed lighter crimes than several individuals at Fishcor who might have actively participated in the bribery syndicate.

To sum up the lethargic approach to this matter, one wonders why Nghipunya was suspended so much later after his cohorts were arrested and what took nearly two months to finally arrest him.

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