US, China extend trade talks

American president Donald Trump has fired off some positive tweets, while the world holds it breath.

10 January 2019 | Economics

Vishnu VarathanMizuho Bank Economics Head"Even if a deal is cobbled together, the more strident trade hawks in the White House and Trump may not sign off."

United States and Chinese envoys extended trade talks into a third day yesterday, after President Donald Trump said negotiations aimed at ending a tariff war were "going very well!"

"Talks with China are going very well!" Trump said late Tuesday on Twitter.

The two sides announced no details, but Asian stock markets rose on news of the decision to extend negotiations that originally were planned for two days. Hong Kong's main market index rose 2.3% while Tokyo was up 1.3%.

Envoys are meeting face-to-face for the first time since Trump and his Chinese counterpart, Xi Jinping, agreed on 1 December to suspend further punitive actions against each other's imports for 90 days. The fight was sparked by American complaints that Beijing steals or pressures companies to hand over technology.

Washington is pressing Beijing for changes including rolling back plans for a government-led creation of Chinese global champions in robotics and other fields. Europe, Japan and other trading partners echo Washington's complaints that those violate Beijing's market-opening obligations.

Chinese officials have suggested Beijing might alter its industrial plans but reject pressure to abandon what they consider a path to prosperity and global influence. They have tried to defuse pressure for more sweeping changes by offering concessions including purchasing more American soybeans, natural gas and other exports.

Neither side has given any indication that their basic position has changed. Economists say the 90-day window is too short to resolve all the conflicts in trade relations between the biggest and second-biggest global economies.

Trump's "cheerleading tweet" feeds hopes for a settlement, Mizuho Bank's Vishnu Varathan said in a report. However, he cautioned, "Even if a deal is cobbled together, the more strident trade hawks in the White House and Trump may not sign off."

On Tuesday, an official Chinese newspaper warned Washington "cannot push China too far" and must avoid a situation that "spins out of control".

The talks went ahead despite tension over the arrest of a Chinese tech executive in Canada on US charges related to possible violations of trade sanctions against Iran.

Trump has imposed tariff increases of up to 25% on US$250 billion of Chinese imports. China responded by imposing penalties on US$110 billion of American goods, slowing customs clearance for US companies and suspending issuing licenses in finance and other businesses.

Cooling economic growth in both countries is increasing pressure to reach a settlement.

For its part, Beijing is unhappy with US export and investment curbs, suggesting it might demand concessions. Chinese officials complain about controls on "dual use" technology with possible military applications. They say China's companies are treated unfairly in national security reviews of proposed corporate acquisitions, though almost all deals are approved unchanged.

Yesterday a Reuters report said the US trade delegation in Beijing was "wrapping up" meetings with Chinese officials and would return to the United States later on Wednesday after a "good few days", quoting US Under Secretary of Agriculture for Trade and Foreign Agricultural Affairs, Ted McKinney.

"I think they went just fine," McKinney said of the talks. "It's been a good one for us," he said without elaborating.

However, people familiar with the talks said that the two sides were further apart on Chinese structural reforms that the Trump administration is demanding. If no deal is reached by 2 March, Trump has said he will proceed with raising tariffs further.

In what is widely seen as a goodwill gesture, China on Tuesday issued long-awaited approvals for the import of five genetically modified crops, which could boost its purchases of US grains as farmers decide which crops to plant in the spring. -Nampa/ AP/Reuters

Similar News

 

Ramaphosa implicated in corruption allegations

5 hours ago | Economics

Democratic Alliance (DA) leader Mmusi Maimane on Thursday called on South African President Cyril Ramaphosa to cancel all existing government contracts with Bosasa and institute...

Retail industry records negative growth

5 hours ago | Economics

The wholesale and retail trade sector in Namibia has recorded various degrees of negative growth for eight consecutive quarters, a policy analyst at the Namibia...

Okakarara can become a logistics hub: Kandorozu

5 hours ago | Economics

The town of Okakarara in the Otjozondjupa Region has the potential to be transformed into a logistics hub, should all important roads leading to it...

Tame price monster smirks

1 day - 17 January 2019 | Economics

Jo-Maré Duddy Although Namibians enjoyed significant inflation relief last year in the two heavyweights in the consumer basket compared to 2017, they had to endure...

New boss for NDTC

1 day - 17 January 2019 | Economics

The Namibia Diamond Trading Company (NDTC) board of directors has announced the retirement of chief executive officer Shihaleni Ellis Ndjaba.Ndjaba had led the pioneering entity...

Coding for African girls

1 day - 17 January 2019 | Economics

Africa Code Week (ACW) 2018 exceeded all expectations by empowering 2.3 million young people from 37 African countries with digital and coding skills, compared to...

Hong Kong's red-hot property market cools

1 day - 17 January 2019 | Economics

For young Hong Kong residents like Wilson Leung getting a foothold on the city's property ladder has long been a near impossible task, but with...

Job desperation causes chaos

2 days ago - 16 January 2019 | Economics

Masses of unemployed people flocked to TransNamib in Ondangwa yesterday to apply for 40 posts that had been announced on radio. There were scenes...

Higher food, fuel prices expected

2 days ago - 16 January 2019 | Economics

Consumers should brace themselves for even more expensive food and fuel this year. Although motorists received a slight reprieve in fuel prices in December,...

SA regulator weighs Eskom price hike

2 days ago - 16 January 2019 | Economics

NAMPA/ANAAs the National Energy Regulator of South Africa (Nersa) on Monday began public hearings on Eskom's tariff increase application, pressure group SAFCEI suggested that the...

Latest News

NDF defies court order

5 hours ago | Justice

Four days after the Namibian Defence Force was ordered to vacate a Rehoboth shooting range it had illegally occupied in December, the army's locks remain...

Pensioner loses N$400k in scam

5 hours ago | Crime

A 60-year-old woman at Oshakati has lost N$405 000 in an extortion scam staged by fraudsters pretending to be police officers. The incident happened...

Ramaphosa implicated in corruption allegations

5 hours ago | Economics

Democratic Alliance (DA) leader Mmusi Maimane on Thursday called on South African President Cyril Ramaphosa to cancel all existing government contracts with Bosasa and institute...

Retail industry records negative growth

5 hours ago | Economics

The wholesale and retail trade sector in Namibia has recorded various degrees of negative growth for eight consecutive quarters, a policy analyst at the Namibia...

Not a walk in the...

5 hours ago | People

Elizabeth Joseph Business and economics have always fascinated Danny Meyer, the founder of SMEs Compete.For as long as he can remember, Meyer has always harboured...

New year, new CV

5 hours ago | Columns

In the modern era, the job market is fast and competitive and opportunities come in a blink of an eye. If you are not ready...

Parents angry about Andimba School...

5 hours ago | Education

Some parents are accusing the Andimba Toivo ya Toivo Senior Secondary School at Ondangwa of denying grade 12 learners hostel accommodation. They complained to Namibian...

Vote to secure your destiny

5 hours ago | Columns

The Electoral Commission of Namibia (ECN) announced this week it will start conducting supplementary registration for voters in July, ahead of the presidential and National...

Corruption - A social disease

5 hours ago | Columns

How to create reckoning during the Year of Accountability?This article focuses on options to capitalise on the recently proclaimed ‘Year of Accountability’. Given the fact...

Load More