Weather forecasters optimistic

19 October 2018 | Weather

Namibia's rain prospects for next week have been described as excellent.

Forecasters agree that it is expected most of the country can expect rains next week, with heavy clouds starting to spread over the interior on Sunday.

Mike Berridge, a South African weather watcher, says two opposing weather systems will come into play next week.

The first is a powerful high-pressure anticyclone that will be present east of the sub-continent.

“Due to its strong anti-clockwise wind circulation, there will be a low- and mid-level inflow of very humid air into Namibia from the north-, carried by a strong north wind,” Berridge explains.

The second system is a forecast low-pressure trough in the upper atmosphere that will cause high-altitude cyclonic winds with a clockwise wind, which strongly supports updrafts of air from the surface.

“There is also good out-draft at the top towards the east,” Berridge says.

The combined systems favour heavy cloud formation, and is expected to lead to large patches of scattered rain and thunderstorms occurring at various times over Namibia by the end of Wednesday.

“The ... rain should start in the northeast late on Sunday, probably in the evening,” he says.

Namibia Meteorological Services forecaster Odillo Kgobetsi told Namibian Sun yesterday that hot to very hot conditions are expected in the Namibian interior until the weekend, followed by “moist and unstable weather” setting in over the weekend from the northern regions.

This weather is expected to spread of the central and eastern regions, with rain expected from Sunday. Thunderstorms are also expected to occur on Monday and Tuesday.

Meanwhile, water levels in the three central dams supplying Windhoek and surrounding towns with water continue to fall.

The combined capacity of the Swakoppoort, Von Bach and Omatako dams currently stands at 26.1%, compared to 41.8% last season.

The Swakoppoort Dam is at 29.1% of its capacity, compared to 45.4% last year. The Von Bach Dam is at 46.1%, compared to 69.1% last year. The Omatako Dam is empty.

JANA-MARI SMITH