MPs to declare assets again

08 April 2019 | Government

National Assembly speaker Professor Peter Katjavivi says parliamentarians will once again be reminded to update and submit their asset registers for the current calendar year.

This is in line with provisions of the Powers, Privileges and Immunities of Parliament Act of 1996 and is a directive from President Hage Geingob, who together with his wife Monica Geingos, jointly declared their assets in 2015, shortly after he took office.

Parliamentarians are expected to disclose their shares and other financial interests, directorships, partnerships and board memberships, sole ownerships and employment remuneration earned outside parliament.

They must also disclose their liabilities exceeding N$20 000, immovable property, accounts with financial institutions exceeding N$20 000, travel discounts, gifts, sponsorships, consultancies, pensions and any other material benefits.

National Assembly Secretary Lydia Kandetu said the call for submissions will be made during the course of this month.

“The honourable speaker, Professor Peter Katjavivi, will in due course give a reminder for submissions during the month of April as customarily this is done during the month of April. As soon as the secretariat is done with the summary it will be made public,” Kandetu said.

Even though the parliamentarians will be opening up about what they own, to date, parliament is without an auditing system for the declarations, it has been previously reported.

This means the accuracy of the asset declaration register is pinned solely on the honesty of the parliamentarians.

To date, finance minister Calle Schlettwein is the only member of cabinet to have submitted an audited asset register. The last time parliamentarians revealed their assets was in 2015 and 2016.

In the 2015 and 2016 asset declaration, none of the 104 parliamentarians declared that they own vehicles, except newly appointed deputy public enterprises deputy minister Veikko Nekundi, the Windhoek Observer reported in February 2018.

Labour minister Erkki Nghimtina said he only owns 400 shares in Old Mutual, a house in Windhoek measuring 1 050 square metres, a farm near Otavi measuring 5 400 hectares, a traditional house in Omahenge and a plot measuring 9.8 hectares.

Deputy prime minister Netumbo Nandi-Ndaitwah revealed she only owns two houses, one in Henties Bay and another in Eenhana, and a farm measuring 6 200 hectares.

Except for a residential house at Omuthiya, which he declared in 2015, defence minister Penda ya Ndakolo declared nothing in 2016.

Works minister John Mutorwa's asset register shows he is not linked to any company. He declared having four houses - two in Rundu, one in Windhoek and one in Shankara village. Prime minister Saara Kuugongelwa-Amadhila declared having 50% shares in Seize the Moment Investment 56 cc, a farm and three properties, all in Windhoek.

National Assembly deputy speaker Loide Kasingo declared that she owns 16% shares in Luxury Investment 165, a medical health administration company. She also has two houses in Swakopmund and Windhoek.