Change is the only constant

28 July 2020 | Columns

Ester Kamati



When making a big decision, along with being scared, doubts start to form about whether it is even worth it, if it will work out or if remaining in the same position was actually the better option because “if it’s not broken, don’t fix it”.

How does one ever know that the decision they are making is a good one? You don’t. You just go with it and convince yourself that things are somehow going to work out and, eventually, you’ll be able to make a conclusion from the outcomes.

I recently had a discussion with a two female entrepreneurs who shared the story of how they were not feeling content with the work they were doing, and based on that, decided to leave their 8-5 jobs.

I could not get over how big a step that is for somebody to take overnight. I can’t even imagine the thought crossing my mind, never mind carrying the task all the way through.

Just through listening, I was already scared for them. How would they survive with paying bills and feeding their families? It was only after listening and thinking to myself that I realised that change really is the only constant.

I could not comprehend the idea because I was thinking from a place of being comfortable. These ladies decided to throw themselves into a place of discomfort in order to grow. They didn’t know where exactly that decision would take them until they took it.

This is a typical example of being “thrown in the deep end”. This is the exact situation where your only instinct is survival, and in order to survive, one needs to be honest with themselves, and ensure that they do whatever is necessary to remain afloat and eventually, surpass survival and soar.

Big decisions call for major commitment.

Now, there are a lot of people who probably think like me. We are very quick to engage in discussions about accepting change, but struggle to embrace it ourselves. We genuinely think that we are ‘woke’, but in actuality, we are no different from people who openly oppose change. The only difference is that we think we are accepting of change, but are not. We agree with the concept and probably would adapt to a situation that we find ourselves in, but would not deliberately put ourselves in a position where we would have to make major transformation.

There are always big decisions to make and it’s not always as huge as leaving your job, but I for one have a habit of avoiding things that require me to take on any extra responsibility. Allowing myself to embrace such ideas would be a bold step for me. Sometimes the only thing standing between ourselves and our goals is our own mindset, and in order to confront this, we need to be honest with ourselves and adjust as needed.